Hints and Tips - Shocker Fluid

From: Awini Ambuj Shanker
Sent: 18 February 2002
To: british-cars-pre-war; mg-t; mg-tabc; rolls-bentley; pre-xk
Subject: shocker fluid

Hi all

can anyone tell me if an alternate fluid to shocker oil can be used in prewar lever action shocks? i want to fill up the shocks on my 1939 lagonda and shocker fluid for this aplication is not availible here in india, someone sugested engine oil and TQ oil (for automatic transmisions) but im not sure i want to put them,another friend sugested hydraulic fluid for the citroen DS(someone has about a gallon availible) would do the job well, but will it?

thanks

regards

Awini Ambuj Shanker
New Delhi
INDIA
27 Austin 12/4
30 Studebaker
39 Lagonda V12
46 MG TC
66 VW Karmann-Ghia


From: Graham Orme-Bannister
Sent: 18 February 2002
To: Awini Ambuj Shanker
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: shocker fluid

Every reference I have ever seen to pre war lever shock absorbers specifies a straight SAE 20 viscosity hydraulic oil. Brand name or intended application does not matter as long as this basic viscosity with no fancy additives is met. Castrol Medium Damper and Fork Oil is sold by Castrol Classic, but any competent lubricant supplier should be able to provide a basic SAE20 hydraulic oil.

Graham Orme-Bannister
Alresford, Hampshire, UK


From: Graham Orme-Bannister
Sent: 18 February 2002
To: Awini Ambuj Shanker
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: shocker fluid

Further to previous note, it occurred to me afterwards that you may mean Luvax vane type shocks as opposed to piston types like Armstong. Vane type shocks need an SAE 140 viscosity fluid but again viscosity is the only thing that really matters.

Graham Orme-Bannister
Alresford, Hampshire, UK


From: C Sherriff
Sent: 19 February 2002
To: Awini Ambuj Shanker
cc: pre-xk; rolls-bentley; mg-tabc; mg-t; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: [mg-tabc] shocker fluid

Awini

I shall be interested in others suggestions.

A good alternative is the oil used in Hydraulic Jacks it has the right non compresable qualities. - and it is available in various grades and a bit of experimentation might be in order if you do have any of the original fluid to compare the viscosity with.

To do this make a container with a small hole in the bottom ( say 1/16 inch) Measure a known quantity of the original fluid - pour into the container and measure the time taken to drain. Now take the same quantity of the new fluid - at the same temperature (important) and repeat. If the second time is less the new fluid its too thin - If more then too thick!

When you find one thats right fill the shock absorber and see how it feels = then if not right use thicker or thinner oils as appropriate.

Regards

Clive


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