Hints and Tips - Running Boards/Petrol Cans

From: John Hardy
To: British-Cars-Pre-War, Riley
Subject: Running Board treads
Date: Sun, 9 May 1999

Dear all,

I've just fitted the running board treads on one side if the Lynx with quite pleasing results. The technique I used was...........

1/ measure the length of aluminium extrusion and cut off.

2/ mark the holes and pre drill 4ba tapping size.

3/ de burr

4/ drill 5/16" hole 1/2" from both ends and cut from end of the extrusion to the hole to form a slot.

5/ file the corners off the ends so that when they are folded into each other a point is formed. Fold in one end. File off and polish.

6/ fit the 4BA screws.

7/ fit the rubber after cutting the end to a point to fit that formed in the aluminium. (use lubricant to make life easy)

8/ cut off the rubber to oversize by approx 1/8".

9/ cut to point and fold over point

10/ fit it to the running board into predrilled holes. If they aren't predrilled drill both at step (2)

Hope this helps.

I've got some tread left over after over ordering. anyone want it?

In the fervent hope that your mechanical contrivances remain trouble free

JH


From: TA TERRY
Date: 9 May 1999
Subject: Re: Running Board treads
To: John Hardy

In a message dated 5/9/99 John Hardy writes:

<< 6/ fit the 4BA screws. >>

John, we are creeping up on doing this same to the SA Tickford....the alloy strips are precut and the ends formed but on my TA these strip had square holds punched and what we call "carriage bolts" were used...these being oval headed with a square underneath...I presume just flat head countersunk 4 ba screws were used...and should work well. I think I still need some 3 BA screws for my petrol sender on the NA....

When we got back to London, I was pleased to find that Sarah had bought me a genuine Pratt petrol can....rectangular and about an imperial gallon I would recond.....would any lister know who these were finished as original? This one had been bead blasted and varnished. A good friend here, now deceased, was Curgie Pratt whose grandfather lent his name to the Standard Oil Company of the UK..

Cheers


From: Michael Lunch
To: TA TERRY
Subject: Re: Running Board treads
Date: Mon, 10 May 1999

I have one of these cans - an original - untouched - 2 galls capacity (imp!). It was used for the lawn mower fuel for years until I rescued it. Finish is a mid green paint - fairly matt on my can. Brass cap un treated.

Mike Lunch


Date: Mon, 10 May 1999
To: british-cars-pre-war
From: Peter Adams
Subject: Re: Running Board treads

I have a one gallon Pratts can, with correct brass filler cap, that I have been using for lawn mower petrol for the last five years, while it waits to be mounted on the running board of my 1924 Morris Oxford. The word "Pratts" is written in script on the side, and the top is embossed "Pratts Petroleum Spirit - Highly Inflammable - 3/-". It is in excellent condition, but it is impossible to tell what colour it was originally.

For the last three years I have been asking on various old car news groups, but nobody seems to know what the colours should be. I have looked through all my motoring books, but the only coloured illustration I can find shows a can of Pratts Aviation Spirit. This is bright, light green with yellow script.

If all else fails, I shall use these colours, but sure as shooting, sooner or later some know-all will come up to me and say: "Your can's the wrong colour".

Does anyone have the right answer?

-- Peter Adams,


Date: Tue, 11 May 1999
From: Bob Zwart
To: John Hardy
Subject: Re: Running Board treads

Just take an old MGTC/TD running board strip and see how they did it. It is relatively simple if you have a sample

BOB


Date: Mon, 10 May 1999
To: british-cars-pre-war
From: Peter Adams
Subject: Pratts Can

I just said:


>I have a one gallon Pratts can...

It should, of course, read two gallon.
--
Peter Adams,


From: Graham Orme-Bannister
Date: Mon, 10 May 1999
Subject: TWO GALLON PETROL CANS
To: british-cars-pre-war

I have found one reference to the colours of two gallon petrol cans. This is in the book "Behind the Wheel" by Lord Montagu and Wilson McComb published in 1977. Pratt's cans were green, Shell red, BP green with a yellow shield and Redline blue and red. There were many other suppliers, and most companies developed different colours for different products, e.g. aviation fuel was different from motor fuel. If anybody wants to pursue this matter the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu has a good collection of period garage equipment and a superb library. Unfortunately I believe they have started to charge for library research. I think there is also a specialist "oiliana" museum somewhere in the Midlands, but I cannot remember the name. I am sure somebody will know.

Graham Orme-Bannister


Date: Mon, 10 May 1999
From: Pete Bishop
To: TA TERRY
Subject: Pratts can

I have one of these and wondered the same thing about original colours. I have seen a couple now with what I believe is the original paint. The body of the the can was dark green and the embossed writing was highlighted in gold. There should also be a date stamped on the underside of the can that will tell you when it was made.

Pete Bishop
Swindon UK


From: TA TERRY
Date: 10 May 1999
Subject: Re: TWO GALLON PETROL CANS
To: Graham Orme-Bannister

In a message dated 5/10/99 Graham Orme-Bannister writes:

<< I have found one reference to the colours of two gallon petrol cans. This is in the book "Behind the Wheel" by Lord Montagu and Wilson McComb published in 1977. Pratt's cans were green, >>

Thanks for all the Pratts info guys...Green it is...with gold lettering....sounds great. My can is the two gallon version with 3/- on top and "Valor 2 34" written on the bottom. I presume that means the can was made in Feb 1934 and that two gallons of petrol cost 3 shillings....would that be right?

Curgie told me once the story .... his great grandfather was selling kerosene lamp oil in Brooklyn NY in about 1870 when one day this old gent named John D. Rockefeller turned up and wanted to buy the company....Curgie said that he gave thanks every day that great grandpa took stock in Standard Oil instead of cash! Later SO marketed product in England under the Pratts name...

Cheers,


From: Michael Lunch
To: TA TERRY, Graham Orme-Bannister
Subject: Re: TWO GALLON PETROL CANS
Date: Tue, 11 May 1999

Just for the record, my "original Pratts can" has NO SIGN of gold lettering! Maybe it was an economy can! Maybe it is to do with the exact period of the can? Mike


Date: Tue, 11 May 1999
From: Bob Zwart
To: Michael Lunch
cc: TA TERRY, John Hardy
Subject: Re: Actually, Petrol Cans

The subject had been Running Board Treds...
I used the word "actually", as this is a word my granddaughters use to emphasize a subject..... I was lucky enough several years ago to obtain a 5 Litre? ("possibly", meaning I don't know, as never having filled it to see.) rectangular can with a eared, bronze cap with the MG logo(4 1/2" octagon) embossed in the side; painted black. Dated by the previous owner as 1938(and 2 gallon), stamped Valor 2 38 on the bottom, found in Scotland. Looks neat, he had another that he thought was repainted red, but I elected to take this one...

BOB


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