Hints and Tips - Exhaust Paint

From: Stuart
Sent: 03 December 2000
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: painting exhaust

Dear All,
Have spent some time and effort trying to make paint stay on the Brooklands silencer on my A7 Ulster based special. At the same time I would like to inhibit the progress of corrosion. I should tell you that the silencer is old but good, having survived 30+ years on a shelf in my Dad's shed, protected by that horrid aluminium paint. In haste for the MOT I initially rubbed down the silver paint and sprayed with Sperex. After about 25 miles the Sperex all began to peel off. Seemed fair enough given my poor preparation. Second attempt; bare metal (as far as was possible) with wire brush in drill, then a coat of Trustan as rust inhibition, then Hycote heatproof paint. The Hycote has not dropped off but after a month there is a fine, even coat of light rust.... Does anyone have a favourite remedy for this situation?

Regards, Stuart.
--
Stuart Ulph


From: John Layzell
Sent: 03 December 2000
To: Stuart Ulph; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Painting exhaust

In the USA, there is a product called POR-15 Black Velvet heat resistant paint which withstands temperatures up to 1200 degrees and inhibits rust very. Alternatively you can use aerosol paint designed for gas barbeques. I treated my 1925 Alvis original manifold in 1993 and there is still no sign of any rust, even in Miami's high humidity.

Good luck!

John Layzell
1925 Alvis SC 12/50 - oldest Alvis in North America


From: David Cochrane
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Stuart Ulph
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: painting exhaust

Stuart,

Funnily enough, I was asking this very question at last week's PWA7C meeting. The best answer I got was from Peter Stevenson, which was aluminium metal spraying. Nearest place to me that I know of and can recommend is Marawise in Coventry, 024 7668 7121. They have done a lot of shot blasting & powder coating for me.

Best regards,

David C.


From: Christian Fairburn
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust

John Layzell wrote:
> In the USA, there is a product called POR-15 Black Velvet heat resistant
> paint which withstands temperatures up to 1200 degrees and inhibits rust
> very. Alternatively you can use aerosol paint designed for gas barbeques.

I think Frost may sell the product in the uk ?

(sorry - I'm one of the list lurkers !)

Chris.

Christian Fairburn


From: David Laver
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Christian Fairburn
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust

Christian,

Nothing to apologise for ( BUT !!!! ) now you're out do you have a pre war car or just an interest and desire for? I have an Austin 7 special I built up from bits in the kitchen and an Lancia Augusta chassis waiting work.

David


> (sorry - I'm one of the list lurkers !)


From: Christian Fairburn
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: David Laver
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust

David Laver wrote:
> Christian,
>
> Nothing to apologise for ( BUT !!!! ) now you're out do you have a pre war car or
> just an interest and desire for?

ha ! I joined the list intending to buy a pre war car to go with my 1963 Wolseley 1500. I somehow ended up with a postwar Rover (1948 P3 75 saloon requiring work ) which in spirit & appearance is quite pre war but as you may know does have some suspension and brake modifications compared to the P2 models ... (its basically a bridge between the P2 and more common P4 models). Its not the 'racing' / trials type of car that many listers appear to own...

> I have an Austin 7 special I built up from bits
> in the kitchen and an Lancia Augusta chassis waiting work.

wow ! - my rover wouldn't fit in our little kitchen .... though parts of it (dashboard) are hung on the wall ! I can relate to the chassis ... I have a body to go with mine but they are quite separate at the moment ! With regard to the Austin 7 - lovely little car that I would like to own in the future. However, from my research most of them seem to be beyond my shallow student type pockets :-)

I do like the sound of the way that listers are very much oriented to using their cars - it might be fun to see if I could make the P3 into a daily driver when she's finished ...

Chris.


From: Clive Sherriff
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: David Cochrane
cc: Stuart Ulph; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: painting exhaust

With all the expertise on exhaust paint - has anyone had outstanding success with a good black near gloss chassis paint - brushing preferably!

Clive


From: James Holland
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Clive Sherriff; David Cochrane
cc: Stuart Ulph; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: RE: painting exhaust

I have used ICI Transport chassis black with some success.It is applied in the same way as Smoothrite but has a much deeper finish.

James H


From: Paul Weston
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Reply requested
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust
>David Laver wrote:
>I somehow ended up with a postwar Rover (1948 P3 75 saloon requiring
>work )
>which in spirit & appearance is quite pre war but as you may know
>does have some suspension and brake modifications compared to the P2
>models .

Underrated cars, pre/post war Rovers. I ran a P2 for lots of years and with apologies to the original author I remember seing the Rover range described long ago in the Rover Register magazine thus(ish):-

P1 A totally non-viable form of transport
P2 Marginally less non-viable than a P1
P3 a retrograde step
P4 The only thing wrong with a P4 was that it never, ever wore out. This was bad for the company finances, Hence the..
P5 A good laugh with a P5 is to open all 4 doors and watch it sag in the middle. Scrap 2 P5s and you have a very useful source of jump leads as the battery cables are about 15ft. long.

>wow ! - my rover wouldn't fit in our little kitchen .... though parts of it
>(dashboard) are hung on the wall ! I can relate to the chassis ... I have a body to
>go with mine but they are quite separate at the moment !

My first A7 chassis also spent a couple of years as a fixture in the kitchen. All those bits of chassis, brackets etc. sticking out are perfect for hanging dishcloths, towels, carrier bags etc.


>it might be fun to see if I could make the P3 into a daily driver
>when she's finished ...
>

Should be fine, esp. a 75 with decent amounts of grunt. As long as you've sorted the fact that they omitted the last 3ft of the chassis from the drawings and attached the rear springs directly to the body (bl***y silly idea or what!!)it should be a very useable car. Its not so may years since there were plenty in regular use. These days you hardly ever even see P4s out - I only know one locally that is a daily driver and the owner's only car.

PaulW


From: Stuart
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Christian Fairburn
cc: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust

Thanks to all who replied to this query, your various advices much appreciated! So you feel less alone, Christian, I too owned a P3 in the early 70s, but took fright and sold it to a man who wore an acrilan bobble hat. The relief was stupendous. I think you are a hero to take it on. A Seven would be so easy, I think you should have one. Regards to all, Stuart Ulph.
--
Stuart


From: Dave Wilcox
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Christian Fairburn
Subject: Re: Painting exhaust

I have had a reasonable success in the past using motorcycle exhaust manifold paints from my local motorcycle shop but the paint mentioned by our transatlantic friend seems to be the answer.

Now I can't resist the temptation to give a little plug for the Pre War Austin Seven Club of which I was Chairman until last October. Anyone contemplating the ubiquitous A7 will find this is the ideal Club with which to make that start. Cars, spares, information, whatever you want plus a very friendly and sociable bunch of members. If anyone is interested I'll send more details direct. By the way re-registering is not a problem and can be done through the Registrar for a modest fee. For a special you will get most likely a Scottish reg unless you can prove some sort of historical facts.

In common with others on the list my interest is trialling to wit I am slowly (very) building a Cambridge special loosely following an original body pattern. Building this way can be quite cheap and you don't need to spend oodles on tuning bits to have fun. One of our members using a Ruby engined car - the Ruby cranks are supposed to be weaker than the two bearing versions - recently came a creditable eight in the VSCC Lakeland gaining a 'first' and missing out on place by cocking up just one hill - goes to prove that the man matters more than the machine. But a perfect example of how you can mix it with much larger and expensive machinery and not be out of place at all.

If anyone has a 'spare' Cambridge windscreen tucked away then I'm yer man to take it off of your hands - your price paid - within reason!

Dave Wilcox

Sevens 1929 1931 1933 + special


From: C. Knight
Sent: 04 December 2000
To: Clive Sherriff; british-cars-pre-war
cc: David Cochrane
Subject: Re: painting exhaust

Clive Sherriff wrote:
>
> With all the expertise on exhaust paint - has anyone had outstanding
> success with a good black near gloss chassis paint - brushing preferably!

I use standard black coach enamel which beats all the fancy modern paints. Available as Chassis Black from Restoration Factors on 01298 814813 or at most major UK Autojumbles
Cliff


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