Hints and Tips - Austin 7 Water Pump

From: David Dalziel
Sent: 20 December 2001
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: A7 Water pump.

I am assembling my supercharged A7 Motor (5psi boost), and am deciding on the best way to run a water pump as there will be times when it will be labouring uphill slowly on unformed roads. It seems to me that a small automotive waterpump would be best, rather than a washing machine pump. Thoughts I have had is early seperate Ford 8 or 10 pump, or similar; otherwise later small pump eg mini with fabricated backing plate. Any suggestions-

David Dalziel
Whangarei
New Zealand


From: Charles Ping
Sent: 20 December 2001
To: David Dalziel; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: A7 Water pump.

The one that fits is the ohv Ford Fiesta pump - with a new backplate and inlet. However it is difficult to make it look very vintage but I'm told that it works.

Charles


From: Charles Ping
Sent: 23 December 2001
To: Ian Kerr; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: A7 Water pump.

>Where do you fit the pump and where do you take the drive from?

On a magneto engine it should be driven from the from of the magneto drive, on a coil engine it has to be driven off the front cam pulley so you lose the fan belt.....not so useful if your car is used on the road! Maybe that's why coil engines didn't run water pumps!

c


From: The Austin Seven Fanatic!
Sent: 23 December 2001
To: Charles Ping
cc: Ian Kerr; british-cars-pre-war; David Dalziel
Subject: Re: A7 Water pump.

The modern way to do it is to use an electric pump (plastic of course), (together with an electronic controller), the pump situated wherever it might be convienient. A suitable (expensive) one is in the current "Demon Tweeks" catalogue I received the other day. This is about #129 + #80 for the controller. Alternatively, a "booster" pump, also plastic and increasingly used on kit cars is a possibility.

Electric pumps are frequently used by our Australian friends, where eligibility is unimportant, but surviving in 40 deg C ambient is!

Barry Lovelock.


From: Jan Stellingwerff
Sent: 24 December 2001
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: A7 pump

David, The water is circulated by thermosyphon so it is already circulating why should you change to circulation by pump. Instead of fitting a waterpump you can install a four blade fan as was on A7 export models. In severe conditions you can also open up the bonnet a little to let the hot air out or make extra louvres in it. Be sure there are no blocked waterways in the cylinder block. You can see the inside of a cylinder block with blocked waterways on the Dutch A7 site http://home.wxs.nl/~roestat/home.html go to "Technics" , "valve seats installment"

Does anybody know a chemical that frees the blocked channels?

Merry X-mas
Jan Stellingwerff


From: mark
Sent: 27 December 2001
To: Jan Stellingwerff; british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: Re: A7 pump

If you are trying to gain a lot more power a water pump is essential and a fan will only sap power, for my engine its the difference between 6100 and 6500 rpm in top! as for cleaning the waterways you can use a mild acid as found in brick cleaner or patio cleaners found at builders merchants

Mark Roper


From: David Dalziel
Sent: 03 January 2002
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: Re: A7 Water pump.

I would like to thank you all for the replies to my question. Have not been able to find an imp pump, not many left here, also no ford fiestas, few modern ford escorts. However while ratting through the 3rd car wreckers at lunch time found a Toyota Crown waterpump which is self contained. The coolant enters diagonally from below and exits from benind and with a bit of chopping off of excess casting should do the job perfectly. I have just finished turning down the flange and turning up the pulley. Wife not happy as it is a beautiful evening here (summer).

--
David Dalziel


From: David Dalziel
Sent: 03 January 2002
To: british-cars-pre-war
Subject: A7 water pump-thak you

I have not been on the computer since Xmas and found that the thankyou I sent did not get throught, I have sent it again. Have spent late nights in the garage while work allows. I answer to some of the replies posted.

I am using a 1926 magneto crankcase complete with Lucus magneto of unknown origin (larger than the A7 one). This allows the multiv v belt take off to come from the crank (well supported by the big end bearings) this puppy is 100mm diameter. Moving clockwise the drive then loops (reversed ie surpentine belt) around the fan pulley (so it turns anticlockwise) with late model 2-bladed fan mounted near normal position, the back down to the Toyota Crown water pump mounted just above the gear train to the magneto drive fitted with a 150mm pully to slow it down, then up around the smallest alternator I could find, then across the motor to the supersharger (small autorotor with 60mm pulley - 5psi boost).

As one can imagin this has required alot of work on the lathe, plasma cutter and TIG, however almost all done now and next stage is reassembling the innerds of the motor, by the way I have doubled up on the big end jets (fire up on the left side), full flow (except rear cam bearing) oil filter. Almost a standard A7. I will put this motor in my currant 1929 special for our VAR A7 Rally in Feb, later would like to build a special based on a Gordan England Cup style, need a 1926 chassis, will use late model Ruby running gear.

Any way off on holiday for 10 days - will miss my garage.

--
David Dalziel


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